Featured articles

Tenured Professorships for Judy Hirst and Mike Murphy

The General Board of the Faculties of the University of Cambridge has recommended that, with effect from 1 October 2018, Professorships be established for Drs Judy Hirst (assigned to the Department of Clinical Neurosciences) and Mike Murphy (assigned to the Department of Medicine).

Congratulations!

How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected families

Researchers have shown for the first time how children can inherit a severe – potentially fatal – mitochondrial disease from a healthy mother.

The study, led by researchers from the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, reveals that healthy people harbour mutations in their mitochondrial DNA and explains how cases of severe mitochondrial disease can appear unexpectedly in previously unaffected families.

 

 

MRC MBU Video Series: "Life at the MRC MBU"

The MBU is pleased to announce that two videos in the series, "Life at the MRC MBU" are now live on our website.

Life at the MRC MBU is aimed at an audience of potential MBU members, whether they be scientists wishing to join our research projects or support staff seeking background information on our activities.  This video showcases the many scientific and social aspects of life in the MBU "family".

MRC MBU scientists involved in new discovery in the fight against Motor Neurone Disease

A new target to fight Motor Neurone Disease (MND) using gene therapy has been uncovered by neuroscientists at the University of Sheffield, in collaboration with scientists in Cambridge, UCL and Ohio.

Alex Whitworth, leader of the MRC MBU's Mitochondrial Neurodegeneration research group, co-directed this research, which opens up a new field for potential therapies for the most common genetic cause of MND.

The research was funded by the MND Association.

MBU scientists secure funding for research on Pearson Syndrome

Michal Minczuk, leader of the MRC MBU’s Mitochondrial Genetics research group and his postdoctoral colleague, Payam Gammage, have been awarded $100,000 by The Champ Foundation to carry out research into Pearson Syndrome – a multi-system disease caused by a deletion in mitochondrial DNA.

The funding has been awarded for two years and the research proposal is one of two projects to be selected from a shortlist of five worldwide.

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