Plasma levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and the risk of future coronary artery disease in apparently healthy men and women: the prospective EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition)-Norfolk population study.

TitlePlasma levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and the risk of future coronary artery disease in apparently healthy men and women: the prospective EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition)-Norfolk population study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsS Boekholdt, M, Kuivenhoven, J-A, Wareham, NJ, Peters, RJG, J Jukema, W, Luben, R, Bingham, SA, Day, NE, Kastelein, JJP, Khaw, K-T
JournalCirculation
Volume110
Issue11
Pagination1418-23
Date Published2004 Sep 14
ISSN1524-4539
KeywordsAged, Carrier Proteins, Case-Control Studies, Cholesterol Ester Transfer Proteins, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Coronary Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Glycoproteins, Humans, Hyperlipidemias, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk, Smoking, Triglycerides
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Low plasma levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are associated with elevated levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), but it remains unclear whether this translates into a concomitant reduction in the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Evidence exists that the effect of CETP depends on metabolic context, in particular on triglyceride levels.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nested case-control study was performed in the prospective EPIC-Norfolk cohort study. Cases were apparently healthy men and women aged 45 to 79 years who developed fatal or nonfatal CAD during follow-up. Control subjects were matched by age, sex, and enrollment time. CETP levels were not significantly different between cases and controls (4.0+/-2.2 versus 3.8+/-2.1 mg/L, P=0.07). CETP levels were significantly related to plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL-C. The risk of CAD increased with increasing CETP quintiles (P for linearity=0.02), such that subjects in the highest quintile had an adjusted OR of 1.43 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.99, P=0.03) versus those in the lowest. Among individuals with triglyceride levels below the median (1.7 mmol/L), no relationship between CETP levels and CAD risk was observed (P for linearity=0.5), but this relationship was strong among those with high triglyceride levels (P for linearity=0.02), such that those in the highest CETP quintile had an OR of 1.87 (95% CI 1.06 to 3.30, P=0.02).CONCLUSIONS: Elevated CETP levels are associated with an increasing risk of future CAD in apparently healthy individuals, but only in those with high triglyceride levels.

DOI10.1161/01.CIR.0000141730.65972.95
Alternate JournalCirculation
Citation Key10.1161/01.CIR.0000141730.65972.95
PubMed ID15337694