Residential area deprivation predicts fruit and vegetable consumption independently of individual educational level and occupational social class: a cross sectional population study in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Canc

TitleResidential area deprivation predicts fruit and vegetable consumption independently of individual educational level and occupational social class: a cross sectional population study in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Canc
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsShohaimi, S, Welch, A, Bingham, S, Luben, R, Day, N, Wareham, N, Khaw, K-T
JournalJ Epidemiol Community Health
Volume58
Issue8
Pagination686-91
Date Published2004 Aug
ISSN0143-005X
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet Surveys, England, Feeding Behavior, Female, Fruit, Humans, Life Style, Male, Middle Aged, Residence Characteristics, Socioeconomic Factors, Vegetables
Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate the independent association between individual and area based socioeconomic measures and fruit and vegetable consumption.DESIGN: Cross sectional population based study.SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 22,562 men and women aged 39-79 years living in the general community in Norfolk, United Kingdom, recruited using general practice age-sex registers.OUTCOME MEASURES: Fruit and vegetable intake assessed using a food frequency questionnaire.MAIN RESULTS: Being in a manual occupational social class, having no educational qualifications, and living in a deprived area all independently predicted significantly lower consumption of fruit and vegetables. The effect of residential area deprivation was predominantly in those in manual occupational social class and no educational qualifications.CONCLUSIONS: Understanding some of the community level barriers to changing health related behaviours may lead to more effective interventions to improving health in the whole community, particularly those who are most vulnerable.

DOI10.1136/jech.2003.008490
Alternate JournalJ Epidemiol Community Health
Citation Key10.1136/jech.2003.008490
PubMed ID15252072
PubMed Central IDPMC1732860