Urinary sugars biomarker relates better to extrinsic than to intrinsic sugars intake in a metabolic study with volunteers consuming their normal diet.

TitleUrinary sugars biomarker relates better to extrinsic than to intrinsic sugars intake in a metabolic study with volunteers consuming their normal diet.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsTasevska, N, Runswick, SA, Welch, AA, McTaggart, A, Bingham, SA
JournalEur J Clin Nutr
Volume63
Issue5
Pagination653-9
Date Published2009 May
ISSN1476-5640
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Animals, Biomarkers, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Diet, Diet Records, Diet Surveys, Dietary Sucrose, Female, Fructose, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Milk, Regression Analysis, Sucrose, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sugars in diet are very difficult to measure because of the unreliability of self-reported dietary intake. Sucrose and fructose excreted in urine have been recently suggested as a biomarker for total sugars intake. To further characterize the use of this biomarker, we investigated whether urinary sugars correlated better to extrinsic compared to intrinsic sugars in the diet.SUBJECTS/METHODS: Seven male and six female healthy participants were living for 30 days in a metabolic suite under strictly controlled conditions consuming their usual diet as assessed beforehand from four consecutive 7-day food diaries kept at home. During the 30-day study, all 24 h urine specimens were collected, validated for their completeness and analysed for sucrose and fructose.RESULTS: The mean total sugars intake in the group was 202+/-69 g day(-1). Daily intake of extrinsic, intrinsic and milk sugars contributed 60.1, 34.4 and 5.5%, to the total sugars intake, respectively. The individuals' 30-day mean sugars excretion levels were significantly correlated with the 30-day means of extrinsic sugars (r=0.84; P<0.001) but not with the intrinsic sugars intake (r=0.43; P=0.144). In the regression, only extrinsic sugars intake explained a significant proportion of the variability in sugars excretion (adjusted R(2)=0.64; P=0.001); daily excretion of 100 mg sucrose and fructose in urine predicted 124 g of extrinsic total sugars in the diet. Using fewer urinary and dietary measurements in the analysis did not change the overall trend of the findings.CONCLUSIONS: In this group of volunteers, sucrose and fructose in urine better correlated to extrinsic than to intrinsic sugars intake.

DOI10.1038/ejcn.2008.21
Alternate JournalEur J Clin Nutr
Citation Key10.1038/ejcn.2008.21
PubMed ID18301435
Grant ListMC_U105630924 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
/ / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom