Epidemiologic assessment of sugars consumption using biomarkers: comparisons of obese and nonobese individuals in the European prospective investigation of cancer Norfolk.

TitleEpidemiologic assessment of sugars consumption using biomarkers: comparisons of obese and nonobese individuals in the European prospective investigation of cancer Norfolk.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsBingham, S, Luben, R, Welch, A, Tasevska, N, Wareham, N, Khaw, KTee
JournalCancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume16
Issue8
Pagination1651-4
Date Published2007 Aug
ISSN1055-9965
KeywordsAged, Ascorbic Acid, Biomarkers, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Proteins, Dietary Sucrose, Eating, Epidemiologic Studies, Europe, Feeding Behavior, Female, Fructose, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prospective Studies, Vitamins
Abstract

We have previously shown that urinary sugars excretion in 24 h urine collections can serve as an independent biomarker of sugars consumption. In the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC) Norfolk study of nutrition and cancer, this biomarker in spot urines has been assessed in a cross-sectional comparison of 404 obese individuals aged 45 to 75 years with a body mass index (BMI) of >30 kg/m(2) and 471 normal weight individuals aged 45 to 75 years with a BMI of <25 kg/m(2). In individuals of normal weight, sucrose, protein, and vitamin C intake were positively and highly significantly related to biomarkers in spot urine or plasma (P < 0.001), but there were no significant associations between biomarkers and food intake reports in the obese. Odds ratios for a BMI of >30 were significantly elevated for urinary sucrose [trend per milligram per liter quintile, 1.13; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.02-1.25; P = 0.016], and the odds ratio for urinary sucrose/fructose ratio was highly significant (trend per quintile, 1.264; 95% CI, 1.142-1.401; P < 0.001). No associations for sugars intake and obesity were found using a food frequency questionnaire, and dietary vitamin C was apparently associated with increased risk (P < 0.001) despite an inverse association for plasma vitamin C. Nutritional biomarkers of consumption can complement existing methods for assessing cancer risk from diet in epidemiologic studies.

DOI10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-1050
Alternate JournalCancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
Citation Key10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-1050
PubMed ID17684141
Grant ListG0401527 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_U106179471 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom