Haem, not protein or inorganic iron, is responsible for endogenous intestinal N-nitrosation arising from red meat.

TitleHaem, not protein or inorganic iron, is responsible for endogenous intestinal N-nitrosation arising from red meat.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsCross, AJane, Pollock, JRA, Bingham, SAnne
JournalCancer Res
Volume63
Issue10
Pagination2358-60
Date Published2003 May 15
ISSN0008-5472
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Animals, Cattle, Cross-Over Studies, Dietary Supplements, Feces, Heme, Humans, Intestine, Large, Iron, Dietary, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Nitrites, Nitroso Compounds
Abstract

Many N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are carcinogens. In this controlled study of 21 healthy male volunteers, levels of NOC on a high (420 grams) red meat diet were significantly greater (P = 0.001) than on a low (60 grams) meat diet but not significantly greater when an equivalent amount of vegetable protein was fed. An 8-mg supplement of haem iron also increased fecal NOC (P = 0.006) compared with the low meat diet, but 35-mg ferrous iron had no effect. Endogenous N-nitrosation, arising from ingestion of haem but not inorganic iron or protein, may account for the increased risk associated with red meat consumption in colorectal cancer.

Alternate JournalCancer Res.
Citation Key700
PubMed ID12750250