Phytoestrogen exposure correlation with plasma estradiol in postmenopausal women in European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk may involve diet-gene interactions.

TitlePhytoestrogen exposure correlation with plasma estradiol in postmenopausal women in European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk may involve diet-gene interactions.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsLow, Y-L, Taylor, JI, Grace, PB, Dowsett, M, Scollen, S, Dunning, AM, Mulligan, AA, Welch, AA, Luben, RN, Khaw, K-T, Day, NE, Wareham, NJ, Bingham, SA
JournalCancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume14
Issue1
Pagination213-20
Date Published2005 Jan
ISSN1055-9965
KeywordsAged, Analysis of Variance, Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, Chromatography, Gas, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet, Estradiol, Europe, Female, Genotype, Humans, Mass Spectrometry, Middle Aged, Phytoestrogens, Polymorphism, Genetic, Postmenopause, Prospective Studies, Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin, Statistics, Nonparametric
Abstract

Cross-sectional studies investigating the relationship between phytoestrogens in diet, urine, or blood with plasma estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) have been inconclusive. We investigated the relationship among phytoestrogen exposure, polymorphisms in the ESR1, COMT, CYP19, and SHBG genes, and plasma estradiol and SHBG levels in 125 free-living postmenopausal women taking part in a cohort study (European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk) using three different markers: dietary, urinary, and serum phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogen levels (daidzein, genistein, glycitein, O-desmethylangolensin, equol, enterodiol, and enterolactone) in spot urine and serum were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Plasma estradiol and SHBG were measured by immunoassays. Adjusting for age and body mass index, urinary daidzein, genistein, glycitein, and serum daidzein and glycitein were negatively correlated with plasma estradiol (R = -0.199 to -0.277, P <0.03), with particularly strong associations found in the 18 women with CC genotype for ESR1 PvuII polymorphism (R = -0.597 to -0.834, P < 0.03). The negative correlations observed between isoflavones and estradiol in women as a whole became no longer significant when we excluded women with ESR1 PvuII CC genotype, indicating that the correlations observed were due mainly to this group of women. There was no relationship between dietary isoflavones and plasma estradiol and no association was found between any of the dietary, urinary, and serum phytoestrogen and plasma SHBG or between these factors and polymorphisms in CYP19, SHBG, and COMT. We conclude that higher isoflavone exposure is associated with lower plasma estradiol in postmenopausal women and that this preliminary study is suggestive of the involvement of diet-gene interactions.

Alternate JournalCancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
Citation Key804
PubMed ID15668497